Saturday, September 27, 2014

iOS 8: Problem With Japanese Keyboard

A number of users have found that updating to iOS 8 makes the Japanese keyboard non-functional.  A possible fix for this is to reset the keyboard dictionary, via

Settings > General > Reset and tap Reset Keyboard Dictionary.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

OS X: New Mongolian Keyboard Layout

Thanks to Mukhbayar Batkhuu there is a new Mongolian Cyrillic keyboard layout for OS X available at

Mongollian Keyboard for Mac


Another one can be found at

Mountainedge

And a QWERTY version can be had here.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

3rd Party Keyboards for iOS 8

I have installed one of the 3rd party custom keyboards which have become possible with iOS 8 -- Minuum.  This article mentions some others which should be available.

If readers come across any which are useful for languages other than English, let me know.   So far:

+Sangam for Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu, with suggestions, autocorrect, and next-word prediction.

+Georgian Keyboard for Georgian.






New Keyboards and System Languages in iOS 8

Apple has added keyboards for English (India),  Bengali, Filipino, Marathi, Slovenian,  and Urdu in the new version of iOS released 9/17/14.

The settings formerly available for us additional hardware-type keyboard layouts with iOS devices are no longer available.   For example, under English these were:  us, dvorak, colemak, us international-pc, us extended, british, french, german, spanish-iso, italian, dutch, belgian.

iOS 8 is supposed to have the ability to use custom keyboard layouts, and perhaps that will help make up for that omission.

New system localizations are Hindi and Tamil.




iPhone 6 Language Support

From Tech Specs published 9/17/14:


Language support
English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), Chinese (Simplified, Traditional, Traditional Hong Kong), French (Canada, France), German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish (Mexico, Spain), Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese
QuickType keyboard support
English (Australia, Canada, India, UK, U.S.), Chinese - Simplified (Handwriting, Pinyin, Stroke), Chinese - Traditional (Cangjie, Handwriting, Pinyin, Stroke, Sucheng, Zhuyin), French (Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Germany, Switzerland), Italian, Japanese (Kana, Romaji), Korean, Spanish, Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Catalan, Cherokee, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Emoji, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, Flemish, Greek, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Marathi, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Serbian (Cyrillic, Latin), Slovak, Slovenian, Swedish, Tamil, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese
QuickType keyboard support with predictive input9
English (Australia, Canada, India, UK, U.S.) Chinese (Simplified, Traditional), French (Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Germany, Switzerland), Italian, Japanese, Spanish, Portuguese (Brazil), Thai
Siri languages
English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), Spanish (Mexico, Spain, U.S.), French (Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Germany, Switzerland), Italian (Italy, Switzerland), Japanese, Korean, Mandarin (Mainland China, Taiwan), Cantonese (Hong Kong)
Dictation languages
English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), Spanish (Mexico, Spain, U.S.), French (Canada, France, Switzerland), German (Germany, Switzerland), Italian (Italy, Switzerland), Japanese, Korean, Mandarin (Mainland China, Taiwan), Cantonese (Hong Kong), Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Greek, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malaysian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Slovakian, Swedish, Turkish, Thai, Ukrainian, Vietnamese
Definition dictionary support
English, Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese (Brazil), Russian, Thai, Turkish
Bilingual dictionary support
Simplified Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Spanish
Spell check
English (Australia, Canada, UK, U.S.), French, German, Italian, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil, Portugal), Russian, Swedish, Turkish

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Fonts and Keyboards for Greek/Coptic Scholars

OS X users needing special notation and characters for work involving ancient Greek or Coptic texts may be interested in the set of fonts and keyboards provided by Ralph Hancock and Jean-Luc Fournet at

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

OS X: Assigning Default Language Keyboard to Apps

If you have a need to have particular apps always use the same input source, AutoKeyboard is designed to do that:

http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/51829/autokeyboard

Monday, June 2, 2014

New Language Features in iOS 8

At the WWDC June 2, Apple announced some new language features to appear in the next version of iOS:

+multilingual predictive typing via QuickType (14 countries).

+22 new languages for Siri

+real time in line translation via Bing

+ability to install system-wide third party keyboards

See the first Comment to this article for additional details.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

New Input Methods for Indic Scripts

Thanks to Ranganath Atreya we now have some alternatives to Apple's keyboards for Indic scripts.  His user-configurable IM covers a variety of transliteration systems for Unicode Bengali, Devanagari, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Malayalam, Oriya, Tamil, and Telugu.  You can download it at

https://github.com/ratreya/Lipika_IME

OS 10.8 or higher is required.  A chart of the mappings can be found here.

If any users try this out, I would welcome seeing their comments here.

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

iWork for iCloud Beta: Still No Support For RTL OR Indic Scripts

The improvements added by Apple to iWork for iCloud beta on May 21 did not include any fixes to the broken rendering of Arabic or Indic scripts reported earlier.

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Social Network App for Language Exchange

I recently became aware of an unusual app designed to facilitate social networking across language barriers and help people learning another language.  The range of languages supported seems quite large.  For further info go to

http://www.hellotalk.com/

I have not had a chance to try it myself.

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Language Improvements In iOS and Mac Pages And Keynote

The new versions of iOS and Mac Pages and Keynote released by Apple April 1 have several new features for Arabic/Hebrew.

In Pages:

+New Arabic and Hebrew templates
+Improved support for bi-directional text
+Word count for Hebrew

In Keynote:

+Improved bi-directional support:  switch direction for text, lists and tables

I have not had a chance to test many of these yet, but I see that multicolumn text flow is now correct in Pages for RTL scripts.  To see the new templates you need to switch the OS language to Arabic/Hebrew.

iWork for iCloud Beta: Still No Support For RTL Or Indic Scripts

The improvements added by Apple to iWork for iCloud beta on April 1 did not included any fixes to the broken rendering of Arabic or Indic scripts reported earlier.

Thursday, March 27, 2014

MS Word For iPad: No Support For Arabic Or Indic

My initial tests indicate that the Word for iPad app released today cannot do RTL (like Arabic -- wrong direction and letters not connected) or Indic scripts (like Devanagari -- no conjuncts or vowel reordering).

Like Mac Word, iPad Word can be made to add correct Arabic to an Arabic document created by Windows Word, which may be a useful in some circumstances.

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Adding Reference Dictionaries to iOS

I had not thought it possible to add reference dictionaries to iOS, but recently came across this app which is supposed to be able to do it.  I have not tried it myself.

Dictionary Appender

To add .dict files to your device so that Dictionary appender can process them, use file sharing as described here.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Typing With The International Phonetic Alphabet


The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is not a language but a set of agreed special symbols for describing the pronunciation of any language. Within Unicode they are spread over a number of different blocks, and your OS X should be able to display them with the right fonts. The Wikipedia IPA page is a good way to test your fonts, as the charts there are available both as text and as images.

To input IPA in OS X you need to use the app IPA Palette, the OS X Character Palette, or a special keyboard, such as that created by SIL. Any modern word processor should work.  

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Languages Not Yet Supported in iBookstore

The iBookstore Formatting Guidelines of Nov 13, 2013 lists books in these languages as not yet eligible for distribution:  Amharic, Arabic, Aramaic, Burmese, Persian/Farsi, Hebrew, Khmer, Lao, Malay (Jawi/Arabic), Sinhala, Tamil, Urdu.

Friday, January 31, 2014

Bug in Apple Arabic Fonts

A poster in the Apple Support Communities has pointed out that most Apple Arabic fonts in Mavericks will not display certain vowel sign sequences correctly, include the default Geeza Pro.

My initial testing indicates that Waseem and Diwan work, as well as some English fonts that happen to include Arabic, like Courier New.  Others are the SIL fonts Lateef and Scheherazade.

Monday, January 27, 2014

Writing Systems of the World

I recently came across this interesting map showing the geography of the world's major writing systems.

Friday, January 24, 2014

Mac 30-Year Anniversary Font

See this page to get a custom font created by Apple showing Mac models of the last 30 years.

The characters are in the Unicode Private Use Area.  You should be able to use the Character Viewer or the Unicode Hex keyboard layout to input them (U+E600 to U+E643).  Of course only someone else who has installed the font can see the characters on a web page or email, but they should show up on a .pdf for anyone.

Reading Non-Unicode Sinhala

While it is strongly recommended that only Unicode fonts be used for writing Sinhala, sometimes you have to work with text created using legacy encodings, which will not display properly unless you can find the right custom font.  I recently came across this site where such text can be converted to Unicode:

http://www.ucsc.cmb.ac.lk/ltrl/services/feconverter/

Thursday, January 23, 2014

iWork For iCloud Beta: Still No RTL Or Indic Support

The update for iWork for iCloud Beta announced by Apple January 23, 2014 (the 3rd since its initial release to the public last July) did not fix the broken support for Arabic/Hebrew or Indic scripts.  The characters for Arabic are unconnected and in reverse order, while for Indic scripts vowel reordering and conjunct formation is not possible.   The languages involved are used by about 1 billion people.

Monday, January 20, 2014

App To Add Fonts to iOS Devices

Thanks to Keith Martin, there is now an app available which lets users add fonts to their iOS 7 devices, using the technique described in an earlier article.  You can get it at

http://thehelpful.com/iosfonts/

This should be particularly valuable for users who want to add fonts for scripts still missing from iOS, such as Myanmar, Khmer, Thaana, Syriac, Mongolian, etc.

iOS apps with similar capabilities are at

http://namedfork.net/fontmanager/

https://itunes.apple.com/de/app/anyfont/id821560738?mt=8


Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Mavericks Update Fixes Japanese Input Problem

The glitch with the Japanese Kotoeri IM reported here has been fixed in the OS 10.9.1 update released 12/17/2013.  Kotoeri Preferences (found when one of the Japanese IM's is selected in system preferences/keyboard/input sources) now has a setting for the keyboard layout, as was present in 10.8 and earlier.

Apple has also issued a note regarding a problem some users have encountered with a grayed-out Hiragana input.

In case you are wondering where the "Register Words" option for Kotoeri has gone, this function has now been taken over by system preferences/keyboard/text/text substitutions, as explained here.

Monday, December 16, 2013

Typing Paleo-Hebrew and Phoenician

I recently came across a source for fonts for Paleo-Hebrew and other ancient semitic scripts on this page.

Input for most can be via the OS X Hebrew keyboard layout or my experimental Phoenician range layout available here.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Language Map of the US

I recently came across this map showing details of where languages other than English are common in the US.   Results I found somewhat surprising are the Russian in Alaska,  Chinese in eastern Washington and western NY,  Hindi in Iowa, Hmong in Minnesota,  Arabic in Michigan, and widely scattered areas of German.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Non-Unicode Tamil Fonts

While it is strongly recommended that only Unicode fonts be used for writing Tamil, sometimes you have to work on documents which were created using legacy encodings like TSCII, TAB, and TAM, which will not display properly unless you can find the right non-unicode font.  I recently came across a source for these which may be helpful in such cases at

http://azhagi.com/freefonts.html

Thursday, December 5, 2013

Bug In Apple Devanagari Font

A poster in the Apple Support Communities has pointed out that the font Devanagari Sangam used for iOS (and also available in OS X 10.7 and higher) produces the wrong glyph for the "eyelash RA" character.

The font Devanagari MT, which is the default for OS X, does not have this problem, so using that is a fix.  For iOS there is no way to avoid the bug until Apple fixes Devanagari Sangam.

Monday, December 2, 2013

Keyman App For iOS Now Installs Fonts As Well

The Keyman app which vastly expands the screen keyboard possibilities for iOS devices, reported here, now also installs a font if one is missing (using the technique reported here.).

This should greatly benefit those users whose language has lacked font support up to now -- such as Myanmar, Khmer, Lao, and Amharic/Ethiopic. 


Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Multilingual Mac Web Site Updated

I've updated the reference web site, Unleash Your Multilingual Mac, to reflect OS 10.9.  Comments and corrections by viewers are always welcome.

Friday, November 22, 2013

Alternative Bengali Keyboard for OS X

A poster in the Apple discussion forums (ASC) recently brought the "Bangla-onkur" Bengali keyboard to my attention, which may be of interest to users of this language as an alternative to the Bangla and Bangla QWERTY provide by Apple.  You can get it here.

Thursday, November 7, 2013

Adding Custom Fonts To iOS Devices


Beginning with iOS 7, it is possible to add custom fonts to an iOS device via a mobile.config file.   The reference doc for how one creates such a file and includes a font as a payload can be found here.

Although somewhat complex, this option could be helpful for users who need to add fonts for significant languages still missing from iOS, such as Khmer, Myanmar, and Ethiopic/Amharic.  I have not tried to make such a file myself.

Wednesday, November 6, 2013

New Keyboard App For iOS Covers Vast Number Of Languages

Tavultesoft has released an iOS version of its Keyman multilingual keyboard app, which they say can cover over 600 languages.  For info see this page.

The text produced can be routed directly to the Message, Mail, and Twitter apps.  Unfortunately, where iOS does not yet have a font for the language, you will only see squares in those apps, although you will see the right characters in Keyman itself.


Sunday, November 3, 2013

OS 10.9 Mavericks: New Arabic Fonts

To the 7 Arabic fonts provided with OS 10.8 (Al Bayan, Baghdad, Damascus, Decotype Naskh, Geeza Pro, Nadeem, Kufi) Apple has added 11 more in Mavericks, shown in the graphic below:


iOS 7 Offers Added Languages Display In Some Apps

One of the somewhat hidden features of iOS 7 is the vastly expanded list of extra fonts which can be downloaded by certain apps when necessary.  This can be found at the bottom of

http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5878

As a result, iOS devices can now display Khmer, Myanmar, and Ethiopic in an app like Pages, which was not possible before.  It appears, however, that this cannot yet be done in Mail or Safari, where it is most needed.  And of course there are still no keyboards for these scripts.

Oddly this list includes what appear to be 13 Arabic fonts that are in addition to the 18 already available in OS X.  What these would be needed for is a mystery.

Friday, November 1, 2013

OS 10.9 Mavericks: Language Glitches

Some major language problems  found so far in the new OS X:

+You can no longer set the keyboard layout for Kotoeri Japanese input in its preferences, but have to rely on the layout of the last keyboard used.  This is a throwback to the OS X of several versions ago and extremely annoying, especially for those with JIS keyboards.  They have to activate and select the US layout before using Kotoeri.  Apple has issued a tech note which recommends disabling all other input sources, but this is not a satisfactory solution for most users.

Pending a fix from Apple, you can try an alternative Japanese IM from Google.

+The Message > Text Encoding menu item has been deleted from Mail.  This makes it impossible for the user to fix wrongly encoded incomings or set the outgoing encoding to meet the special requirements of recipients, and significantly reduces the language capabilities of Mail compared to other email clients.  (Note:  Not fixed in Mail update of 11/7/13)

Users can force Mail to send UTF-8 by including a Unicode dingbat in their message, if that is of help in a specific case.

Sunday, October 27, 2013

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Pages 5.0: Significant New Language Features

The long awaited update of Pages 09, Pages 5.0, was released Oct. 22, 2013.  It requires OS 10.9 Mavericks, and my initial testing indicates that there are substantial language improvements:

+Phonetic Guides for Chinese and Japanese (with the content suggested by the app itself)

+Ability to use Windows fonts (as well as Apple AAT) for Arabic and Indic scripts

+A direction control in the Format > Text menu  for Right-to-Left text.

+Vastly improved cursor behavior for Arabic/Hebrew:  It now follows the text from right to left and inserts text where you position it instead of somewhere else.

Someone who knows RTL scripts well will have to give it a thorough evaluation, but it looks like this app may finally be usable in this context.

One bug I have seen is that multicolumn layout does not work right.

Keynote and Numbers lack the text direction control found in Pages, but is seems some direction problems can be solved by a) running the app with the OS set to Arabic, or b) starting your composing with the keyboard set to US and then switching to Arabic when you actually need to input characters.

Support for certain Sanskrit conjuncts appears to be broken when using Apple's Devanagari fonts.  Try Sanskrit 2003 instead.

Unfortunately vertical text for Chinese/Japanese is not yet available.  Also my tests indicate Pages still cannot register the special Unicode characters ZWJ and ZWNJ required for certain Arabic and Indic scripts.

For Apple's info see this.

OS 10.9 Mavericks: New Language Features

So far I have the following:

+3 new system localizations:  Vietnamese, Malay, Indonesian (for a total of 33)

+11 new Arabic fonts

+New reference dictionaries:  Dutch, Italian, Korean, Korean-English, Chinese-English

+Certain voices can now read multiple languages

+No new spellcheck dictionaries or language keyboards

+New Chinese features

I was surprised Apple did not add Lao and Amharic keyboards, as the required font support has been provided for some time already.



iWork For iCloud Beta: Still No RTL Or Indic Support

As far as I can tell, the update for iWork for iCloud Beta announced by Apple October 22, 2013, still has totally broken support for RTL and Indic scripts, as reported here earlier.

PS  The update announced by Apple November 14 also did not fix this.

PSS The updatre announced by Apple January 23, 2014 also did not fix this.

Saturday, September 21, 2013

iOS 7 Language Glitches

I  have seen the following reports in the Apple Support Communities of problems with language support:

+Greek keyboard missing at some stage, so that users with Greek characters in their password can't get access to their devices.  (Fixed with update 7.02?)

+Broken display of Arabic and Korean in some apps.

+New 10-key (T9) Pinyin Chinese input method is only present on devices sold in China .

+New 10-key (T9) Korean input method only present on devices sold in Korea.

+A new, modernistic default font for Thai which some users find barely legible.

+The new Tamil99 keyboard has wrong characters on a number of keys in the shift level.

+Copy/paste causes crashes when the OS is running in Hebrew.

(This is the first time I have ever seen Apple issue an OS with some keyboards only available in one country.  They had to suddenly remove reference to the Chinese one from a long-standing webpage describing new features in iOS 7)

Contributions by readers of other items to this list are welcome. 

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

iOS 7 Language Specs Published

It looks to be the same as for iOS 6 except for the addition of keyboard and dictionary support for Tamil, English (Canadian), and English (Australian).  Although not mentioned in the specs, I understand Chinese/Pinyin includes a new "10 key" option, which is something Chinese users have long wanted.

Also not mentioned are the new reference dictionaries:  Chinese-English, Korean, Korean-English, Italian, Dutch (added to the English, German, French, Spanish, Japanese, and Japanese-English already available earlier).

Scripts where iOS 7 has font support but no keyboard are Armenian, Bengali, Canadian Aboriginal, Georgian, Gujarati, Gurmukhi, Kannada, Lao, Malayalam, Oriya, Sinhala, Telugu, Yi.

Update 9/24/13:  The 10-key Chinese IM is so far only available in China.  A full list of keyboard layouts elsewhere can be found here.  One new one I noticed is an ABNT2 hardware layout for Portuguese, which will be welcome in Brazil.


Language Support

English (U.S.), English (UK), Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Indonesian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese (Brazil), Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Swedish, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese

Keyboard Support

English (U.S.), English (Canadian), English (UK), English (Australian), Chinese - Simplified (Handwriting, Pinyin, Stroke), Chinese - Traditional (Handwriting, Pinyin, Zhuyin, Cangjie, Stroke), French, French (Canadian), French (Switzerland), German (Germany), German (Switzerland), Italian, Japanese (Romaji, Kana), Korean, Spanish, Arabic, Bulgarian, Catalan, Cherokee, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Emoji, Estonian, Finnish, Flemish, Greek, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese (Brazil), Romanian, Russian, Serbian (Cyrillic/Latin), Slovak, Swedish, Tamil, Thai, Tibetan, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese

Dictionary Support (enables predictive text and autocorrect)

English (U.S.), English (Canadian), English (UK), English (Australian), Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), French, French (Canadian), French (Switzerland), German, Italian, Japanese (Romaji, Kana), Korean, Spanish, Arabic, Catalan, Cherokee, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, Finnish, Flemish, Greek, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Malay, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese (Brazil), Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Swedish, Tamil, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese

Siri Languages

English (U.S., UK, Canada, Australia), Spanish (U.S., Mexico, Spain), French (France, Canada, Switzerland), German (Germany, Switzerland), Italian (Italy, Switzerland), Japanese, Korean, Mandarin (Mainland China, Taiwan), Cantonese (Hong Kong)

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Bug in Apple Devanagari Fonts

A poster in the Apple Support Communities has pointed out that the fonts Devanagari MT and Devanagari Sangam used for OS X and iOS produce the wrong glyph for the sequence ph + virama + n.

Note:  Not fixed in 10.9

Info on a separate bug for the sequence r + virama + h was reported here.

Friday, July 19, 2013

iWork for iCloud Beta: No RTL or Indic Support

Apple has released the public beta of its new iWork for iCloud, which provides a web version of Pages and other iWork apps.   My initial tests with Pages indicate that support for Arabic/Hebrew and Indic scripts is totally broken, though I haven't found any mention of that in the support documentation.

I'm not aware of any other Apple product which so completely fails to serve those language communities of about 1 billion people.  Hopefully it will be fixed in future upgrades (though that is not on the list in the "coming soon" features.)

Monday, June 10, 2013

New Language Features in OS X 10.9 Mavericks and iOS 7

There seem to be only a couple new language features in OS X 10.9 and iOS 7 as announced June 10, 2013.  Thanks to blog readers I have so far

1) new French and German voices for SIRI, with more languages promised for later

2) Chinese-English, Italian, Dutch, and Korean reference dictionaries

3) Settings for Tencent Weibo microblogging for Chinese users and multi-character handwriting recognition

4) a possible Tamil keyboard in iOS 7 (OS X has had one for quite a while already).

If you spot any others, let me know.

Thursday, June 6, 2013

Indic Script Bug in Final Cut Pro X

A poster in the Apple Support Communities has pointed out that it's not possible to create Tamil language titles in Final Cut Pro X via copy/paste -- nothing happens.  Direct typing also does not work right.

My tests indicate that the same copy/paste bug affects Burmese, Bengali, Kannada, Khmer, Oriya, and Sinhala.  On the other hand, Devanagari, Gujarati, Gurmukhi, Lao, Malayalam, Telugu, Thai, and Tibetan seem to be possible (but certain Thai characters will not work).

For the problem scripts, workarounds might be to use a separate titling app like Belle Nuit or  create the titles in iMovie and import the track into FCPX.

Friday, May 24, 2013

IDN Email Bug in iOS Mail


If you happen to have an email address that uses an International Domain Name (IDN), i.e. one which includes non-ASCII characters (like info@蓝天东.org), you will find that it's not possible to set up an account in iOS Mail, even when you use the Punycode/ascii version (info@xn--xhq32y7n9a.org in the case mentioned earlier).  It just says the address is invalid and you cannot go further.  You can, however, set up such an account in OS X Mail.

One possible iPad work around is to try the alternative free email app Incredimail, which normally lets you set up everything without problem.  It does not yet support POP, however, only IMAP.  Another work around is to have your IDN at Godaddy, which has its own app for doing email hosted by its servers.

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Bug in Apple Devanagari Font

A poster in the Apple Support Communities has pointed out that the font Devanagari Sangam used for iOS (and also available in OS X 10.7 and higher) produces the wrong glyph for the sequence r + virama + h.   For some reason it generates the glyph for the sequence r + virama + h + e instead.

The font Devanagari MT, which is the default for OS X, does not have this problem, so using that is a fix.  For iOS there is no way to avoid the bug until Apple fixes Devanagari Sangam.

Note:  Fixed in 10.9

Sunday, May 12, 2013

Typing Runic


In addition to its historic uses, the Runic script appears in the recent Hobbit movie and the Tolkien book on which that is based.  To type Runic in OS X you need to add a font and a keyboard layout for the Unicode Runic range.  A good font is Quivira, and there are keyboards available here and here.

Unfortunately there is no way to type Runic yet in iOS devices.

Saturday, May 11, 2013

OS X: Glitches With Traditional Chinese Cangjie Input

A poster in the Apple Support Communities recently pointed out that some Chinese characters cannot be made with the Cangjie sequences they were accustomed to, even though these worked fine on their iOS devices.

It turns out that OS X has different Cangjie sequences for certain characters.  You can see what these are by selecting the character and going to the "flag" (Input Source) menu when Cangjie is selected and then down to the bottom and choosing Find Input Code.